Cart 0

Press About Us

VOGUE ua

“Given the tradition of passing jewelry from generation to generation, it is not surprising that brides from old aristocratic families received colored stones. In 2003, Prince Frederick proposed to his fiancée, Mary Donaldson of Australia, with a ruby ​​ring. His younger brother, Prince Joachim, prepared an engagement ring with sapphire, diamond and ruby ​​for his engagement. In the 20th century, Prince Rainier III of Monaco was a rare exception. To his bride, actress Grace Kelly, he presented two Cartier rings at once in 1956. The first - from rubies and diamonds - seemed to the groom not spectacular enough, and he ordered the second with the largest diamond of the Cartier jewelry house, which became Grace’s main jewelry, ”says Olga Volina, gemologist of One2Three Jewelry.

 

 The Blueprint 

“Investing in colored gemstones is a more complicated process than investing in colorless diamonds, even very large ones,” said Olga Volina, a gemologist and sales director One2Three Jewelry (Gemstone). - If there are approximate prices for diamonds from Rapaport and a system for determining prices and quality 4C, then when you buying colored stones you need to have great experience, intuition, constantly monitor the market and analyze. One cannot do without a qualified gemologist with extensive procurement experience. In addition, there are much fewer colored stones in nature than diamonds, and therefore the process of buying them is always gem hunting. It is like hunting for rare pieces of art. At the same time, the investment component, or, more simply, the return on investment, if the stone is bought correctly, is much higher. For example, some stones in 10-15 years soared up in price more than eight to ten times. As it was with tsavorite (green garnet), blue tourmaline and paraiba tourmaline. An incredible increase in price and popularity over this time was with the stone spinel - until recently, few people knew about it, and now spinel is sometimes more expensive than sapphires. In 2015, a Hope Spinel from the collection of the British collector Henry Philip Hope (a rare gem of 50.13 carats of a pink hue) was sold at auction for almost one and a half million dollars. And this at a starting price of three hundred thousand. It is important to understand that we are talking only about really high-quality, completely natural stones of a rather large size. Now, after a slight decline, Chinese buyers are actively entering the market, thereby greatly heating prices. Given that many deposits are depleted, and there are more rich people with new money who want to invest them, we can safely say that the price increase for rare colored stones will continue.”

Please contact us for any photo, product samples, or other media inquiries at MEDIA - one2three.jewelry@gmail.com